A FILM, A TOPIC, A DEBATE



By thematique

By keynote speakers


OPENING CEREMONY


By invitation, Friday 7th march, 7:00 pm, Victorial Hall

 

 

Nelson Mandela au nom de la liberté

 De Joel Calmettes, 2009, 52', vo fr/ang, st ang

 

"I am not a messiah, but an ordinary man who became a leader because of extraordinary circumstances." Nelson Mandela is a global icon and legendary leader of the apartheid struggle. Who is the man behind the legend? How did a man born into poverty become one of the most influential leaders on the planet ?

 

While South Africa still mourns the death of Mandela, In the Name of Freedom follows the history of the first black President of South Africa, his upbringing in the remote Transkei region and his path to the Presidential Palace in Pretoria. A narrative addressed to Mandela, the film encourages the viewer to take part in the reflective journey and walk in the footsteps of this hero. The film follows the path of the father of modern South Africa and Nobel Peace Prize winner through the use of archival footage, photographs and interviews. The result is a documentary that gives insight into the exceptional political and personal life of the man behind the legend.

 

 

In the presence of :


Navi Pillay, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
Christophe Guilhou, Director of peace, democracy and human rights, International Organisation of La Francophonie
Claude Wild, Ambassador, Head of the Human Security Division, Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (DFAE)
Anne Emery-Torracinta, Counselor of State in charge of Department of education, culture and sports  (DIP), Republic and Canton of Geneva
Sandrine Salerno, Mayor of the City of Geneva

 

Also with the members of the Creative Documentary and of the Fiction and Human Rights Jury




7-03
19h 00

Nelson Mandela au nom de la liberté (version courte)

Joel Calmettes • France • 52´
More Details �

OPENING CEREMONY
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Emery-Torracinta Anne | Guilhou Christophe | Pillay Navi | Salerno Sandrine | Wild Claude |

Is there a third way for Syria ?


Co-presented with Rue89 

 

Syria continues to make international news headlines, and it is only getting worse. The escalation of the horror is seemingly limitless. The third year of the war was marked by the gassing of hundreds of civilians living in the suburbs of Damascus while they slept. Many more thousand remain under seige, starving and uncared for. Hundreds of thousands of refugees and displaced persons are still stranded in camps along the borders of their country, while others risk their lives by attempting to escape by sea.

 

Trapped between daily air attacks by Assad’s forces and street gangs trying to impose their faith by terror, most Syrians’ only hope is that they will be able to survive. Complicit by inaction, the Asad regime and the extremists operate out of sight. Meanwhile, foreign journalists and aid workers continue to be banned or taken hostage.

 

Young activists for Democracy are specifically targeted and often persectured, abducted, detained, tortured, or killed. Nevertheless, some of them continue to pursue their revolution inside and outside the country. Despite the conflict, these activists manage to make their voices heard through images, texts or music, or by humanitarian and civil action on the ground. Neither the Assad dicatorship nor the equally violent opposition movement have offered a democratic and peaceful resolution, and so the rest of Syria is left to find their own way. The question remains, how can we encourage and help them ?

 

Hala Kodmani

 

 

Halla Kodmani




7-03
19h 35

Return to Homs (retransmisson en simultanée)

Talal Derki • Syrie/Allemagne • 87´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Is there a third way for Syria ?
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Abou Fakher Shadi | Daccord Yves | Fares Raed | Kodmani Hala |

War rape and the access to abortion


Co-presented with OAK Fondation, DFAE and the Gender Equality Offfice, UNIGE 


Theirs is a story of war. Whether from Rwanda, Bosnia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Bangladesh or other parts of the world, children born of rape carry with them the stigma of their conception. For the mother, how to raise the children of her assailant? How to love the innocent one who carries this shameful and unspeakable reminder? Pregnancies resulting from rape present both physical and psychological traumas with mothers who are often ostracized and their offspring discriminated against. Furthermore, there is the added risk of injury, sometimes fatal, caused by the brutal act.


Despite this, the United States, a major donor for humanitarian aid, continues to link its funding to prohibitions on abortion. For women and girls who are victims of rape and torture this ban is not only cruel but goes against international humanitarian law.



All nations, including the United States have a duty to "respect and ensure respect" for international humanitarian law under the Geneva Conventions and to provide girls and women raped in armed conflict access to safe abortions. The lifting of this restriction by the United States is an essential component of such efforts.



Providing a hint to the possibility of an access to abortion, a recent resolution, number 2122, of the Security Council bridges a gap in the fight for this fundamental right, but the road ahead is full of pitfalls.


Anne- Claire Adet

 




8-03
14h 30

War babies

Raymonde Provencher • Canada • 92´
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Debates after the film :

War rape and the access to abortion
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Doswald-Beck Louise | Lusenge Julienne | Sottas Eric | Staderini Nelly |

Sport: another fight for women's rights


Co-presented by the City of Geneva, Agenda 21-Ville Durable,  Womanity Foundation and the Equal Opportunities Office, University of Geneva

FREE ENTRANCE


Long reserved for men, sports were declared a right for everyone according to the Olympic Charter. Women are gradually investing in this historically all-male bastion but not without difficulty.

Initiatives demanding that sports are a human right flourish worldwide with the goal of placing sports at the center of programs to promote women's rights and the fight against gender violence. They depart from the idea that sports can create a way to sensitize participants to their fundamental rights and enable them to strengthen leadership and confidence.


However, the world of sports also produces and reproduces stereotyped images of women, men and discrimination, which is particularly expressed in the access women have to sport, the unequal distribution of resources available to athletes or through gender-based violence and harassment still too often present.


So are sports therefore a tool of emancipation and empowerment of women? Can sport be a vector for equality between men and women or does it promote discrimination and gender-based violence?  Can sports for everyone ever become a reality?


One thing is certain, the fight for equality between men and women as well as the rights of women should be observed in all spheres of society, including the world of sport.


Sandrine Salerno
Mayor of Geneva

 

 




8-03
18h 00

Light Fly, Fly High

Beathe Hofseth et Susann Østigaard • Norvège • 80´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Sport: another fight for women's rights
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Bezaguet Laurence | Bobenrieth Maria | Fischer Laurence | Niyonizigiye Dominique | Tuberoso Marco |

Trafficking in Women: where is Europe’s response?


Co-presented with OAK Fondation, Pro Victims and the Gender Equality Offfice, UNIGE 



Whether sexual exploitation, forced labor, begging or trafficking in organs, today hundreds of thousands of human beings are deprived of their freedom, exploited and traded as commodities around the world. 80% of the victims of this modern-day slavery are women and girls. Over 60% of them come from new members of the European Union and Switzerland is a country of destination and transit.



According to UN estimates, every year about 700,000 women and children fall into the nets of well-organized traffickers. Approximately 120,000 women, mostly from Moldova, Ukraine, Russia, Belarus and Romania, but also Nigeria, Colombia and Ecuador are dumped on the Western European market. This traffic generates between 7 and 13 billion dollars per year, often reinvested in the purchase of weapons or drugs.


The EU adopted legislation to fight against this scourge in 2011 but to date only six out of twenty-seven states (Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Poland, Czech Republic and Sweden) have adopted this legislation as national law. Three other countries (Belgium, Lithuania and Slovenia) have started this process.


How best to fight against this serious human rights violations when we know that immigration, 52% of which is made up of women, also contributed to human trafficking?

 

Carole Vann




8-03
21h 00

The Price of Sex

Mimi Chakarova • Etats-Unis • 73´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Trafficking in Women: where is Europe’s response?
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Bugnon Fabienne | Katzarova Mariana | Misail-Nichitin Daniela | Rees Madeleine |

Masterclass : Palestine-Israel, can cinema help?


The 7th Art and human rights special event FIFDH

 

A MASTERCLASS with YAEL Perlov

 

With the participation of Palestinian filmmakers Ahmad Barghouti and Israel Yona Rozenkier

 

Palestine-Israel, can cinema help? The film “Water” by director Yael Perlov brings together Israeli and Palestinian filmmakers to engage in creative dialogue. In a context where dialogue is difficult, this project’s collaborative approach is invaluable. Inspired by the initiative, the FIFDH presents this Masterclass for the first time in Switzerland in partnership with JCall and Manifesto - Movement for a just and lasting peace in the Middle East, two associations that support the solution of a two state system.

 

CO-PRESENTED BY FIFDH, JCALL AND THE MANIFESTE




9-03
11h 00

Water (part 1)

Yael Perlov, Nir Sa’ar and Maya Sarfaty, Mohammad Fuad, Yona Rozenkier, Heli Hardy, Ahmad Bargouthi • 80´
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Masterclass : Palestine-Israel, can cinema help?
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Barghouti Ahmad | Perlov Yael | Rozenkier Yona |

Kazakhstan, dictatorship in the shadow of the oil industry


For decades, Kazakhstan has managed to establish a reputation for stability and an image of a reliable source of oil. However, the veneer of democracy is cracking: the bloody crackdown in December 2011 following riots by oil workers in the southwestern town of Zhanaozen. More than 17 died, 100 injured and hundreds arrested, casting a harsh light on the excessive policies of President Nursultan Nazarbayev.

Since then, police violence, arbitrary arrests, ill-treatment and torture multiply against human rights defenders and journalists, with a violence worthy of the Stalinist purges. Meanwhile, the international community stands by, hears nothing and sees nothing.

However, in 2012, the European Parliament condemned the violent crackdown against protesters in Zhanaozen and conditioned its partnership agreement with Kazakhstan to progress in political reform. Switzerland continues to work with the Nazarbayev regime.


Carole Vann

 




9-03
14h 30

Zhanaozen : The Unknown Tragedy

Yulia Mazurova • Russie • 30´
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Debates after the film :

Kazakhstan, dictatorship in the shadow of the oil industry
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Bilunov Denis | Zhovtis Yevgeniy |

Russia: back to the Soviet age


Co-presented with Reporters Sans Frontières 



The regime of Vladimir Putin is leading the country back to an era of plummeting freedoms as the noose tightens censorship on the media and Internet and laws criminalizing independent NGOs are increased.


The release from prison, timed for the Sochi games, of Mikhail Khordorkovsky and two Pussy Riot singers in late 2013, inspired hopes for a wave of democratization. Nevertheless, dozens of political prisoners remaining behind bars are subjected to inhumane treatment.



For defenders of liberties, the situation has never been so serious since the fall of the Soviet Union. Justice is perverted on the orders of the executive. A law on defamation has been restored and the law against anti- Soviet agitation has reappeared as a law against extremism.



The contempt for freedom displayed by Putin is not confined to domestic affairs but is also manifested in international affairs.



How can this impunity be brought to an end while protecting those who continue to denounce abuses, risking their freedom and their lives in the process?

 


Carole Vann

 




9-03
16h 30

Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer

Maxim Pozdorovkin, Mike Lerner • Russie, Angleterre • 86´
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Debates after the film :

Russia: back to the Soviet age
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Alekhina Maria | Bilunov Denis | Obrecht Hodler Thérèse | Svetova Zoïa |

Belarus: the last dictatorship in Europe


Co-presented with the FIDH and the European Union Delegation to the United Nations in Geneva 

Introductions:

Mariangela Zappia, Ambassador, Head of the European Union Delegation to the United Nations in Geneva

Sacha Koulaeva, Head of the Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk at FIDH



FIFDH dedicate this festival to a Belarusian symbol of the struggle for human dignity: Ales Bialiatski who remains in detention.

 

His country is a blatant example of "democrature".  Elected President in 1994, Alexander Lukashenko has quickly slipped into a type of dictatorship that blocks all areas of freedom, where opponents and human rights defenders are arrested, the media muzzled and independent NGOs prohibited.

 

In December 2010, Lukashenko was re-elected with over 80% of the votes in an election marked by numerous irregularities. Important riots followed the controversial election and since then, the regime has made even more arrests.

 

It is a country of great cultural and economic potential yet one where wages remain among the lowest in Europe and where the population finds itself trapped in a system that responds only to the interests of the presidential clan.



Oil is the backbone of the economy, sold to Western countries with revenues used to finance the power structures that prop up Lukashenko and help him keep the population in a constant state of fear.


The European Union has frozen assets and banned visas for 243 members of the Belarus regime. Lukashenko has used political prisoners as bargaining chips to extract concessions from the European Union. For its part, the Swiss Federal Council prepares to negotiate a free trade agreement with Minsk.


How can this blackmail by the Belarusian regime at the expense of human rights be stopped?

 

Carole Vann




9-03
20h 00

Europe’s last dictator

Matthew Charles • Bélarussie/UK • 55´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Belarus: the last dictatorship in Europe
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Daneiko Elena | Haraszti Miklos | Loersch André | Stefanovic Valentin |

LGBT: love repressed


Co-presented with Avocats Sans Frontières Switzerland, TV5 Monde, the City of Geneva and Dialogai 



On March 23, 2012, UN Secretary General Ban ki-moon made a sensational address to the Human Rights Council in Geneva with these ringing words: “To those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, let me say: you are not alone…Any attack on you is an attack on the universal values of the United Nations.”


This fundamental right enshrined in Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is included in the constitutions of countries around the world. Yet not a day goes by without a person being discriminated against, molested, imprisoned or killed because of sexual orientation.


In 77 countries, LGBT (lesbians, gays, bisexual and transgender) are subject to imprisonment, torture or forced labor. In 10 of these states, they may even face the death penalty. Putting people in prison for their sexual orientation is an unacceptable violation of their dignity and intolerable interference in their private lives


Nevertheless, homophobia is insidious and everywhere as sadly revealed a “Marriage for All" debate in France in 2013. In Africa, 37 countries still criminalize homosexuality and repression has worsened in Nigeria, Uganda and Russia in recent times.


In Cameroon, dozens of people are currently in prison for the “crime” of homosexuality. It was a homophobic climate that killed Eric Lembembe in 2013 and Roger Mbede who died this January in a prison hospital.  In their memory, the struggle will never cease.


Saskia Ditisheim

 




10-03
19h 30

Global Gay, le nouveau défi pour les droits humains

Frédéric Martel et Rémi Lainé • France • 77´
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Debates after the film :

LGBT: love repressed
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Badinter Robert | Crettenand André | Nkom Alice |

The persecution of Myanmar’s Muslims


Co-presented with R89 



In June 2012, the state of Rakhine in Myanmar erupted in communal violence. Buddhists against Rohingya Muslims left 250 dead. The world had its eyes opened regarding the decades of controversy and persecution of a group from neighboring Bangladesh regarded by Myanmar’s Buddhists as illegal immigrants. This Muslim population has been deprived of its basic rights.


 
Approximately 800,000 Rohingyas are today confined to northwestern Myanmar. Often considered stateless even if they are born in the country, they are subject to multiple restrictions on marriage, work and freedom of movement. Hundreds of thousands of them are also victims of forced displacement.


More seriously, influential fundamentalist Buddhist monks target them in speeches. The Myanmar population is generally hostile - even Nobel laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi (1991) has been accused of indifference to their suffering.

 
Beyond the human tragedy, the Rohingya question must be seen in the context of the current transition in Myanmar: democratization, following the establishment of civilian rule in 2011, power struggles, nation building and the need to transcend ethnic diversity. More broadly, the hostility against Rohingyas echoes a fear of Islam throughout the region.
 


Beyond this complexity, it is important to denounce the intolerable abuses perpetrated in the face of international silence regarding this Muslim minority.


Céline Yvon

 




11-03
19h 00

Mantra of Rage

Evan Williams • Australie • 17´
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Debates after the film :

The persecution of Myanmar’s Muslims
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Haski Pierre | Lewa Chris | Ojea Quintana Tomás | Tun Khin | Walton Matthew |

Poverty, populism and the rise of facism


The assassination of the Greek anti-fascist rapper, Pavlos Fyssas, shocked the world.


For months, Europe watched the progressive social degradation of society following austerity measures that prompting citizens to look back to the dark days of fascism. Today, the line between right-wing groups and some radical parties is increasingly porous. Neo -Nazi groups drape themselves in a cloak of respectability by allying themselves with right-wing parties to seduce the masses and gain power through the ballot box.


Greece’s far right Golden Dawn party entered parliament with 7% of the vote and 18 deputies. In Slovakia, a rightwing xenophobic and anti- Roma party now leads an entire region. In Hungary, the government of Victor Orban has criminalized poverty. In France, racism is trivialized with migrants becoming scapegoats for the economic crisis. In the name of freedom of expression, incitement to hatred, once responsible for the worst crimes against humanity, is gaining ground.


Whether the right to housing, work or health, austerity policies affect the most vulnerable. A permanent worsening of the crisis allows the far right to demonize the Other: foreigners, asylum seekers, those who are different. The emergence of aggressive fascism threatens the stability of society, not only in Greece but also throughout Europe.

 

Leo Kaneman




11-03
20h 30

The Cleaners

Konstantinos Georgousis • Royaume-Uni • 37´
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Debates after the film :

Poverty, populism and the rise of facism
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Gachet Isil | Georgousis Konstantinos | Levaï Elie | Veya Pierre |

Land acquisition and forced evictions


Co-presented with the Diplomatic Club, Fondation for Geneva and the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID



Since 2000, more than 50 million hectares of farmland in developing countries have been sold to foreign investors, private companies, financial speculators or governments trying to ensure their own food security.

 

The seller countries are often overwhelmed with debt. Under pressure from international donors like the World Bank or IMF, debtor nations thought they could partly solve their problem by selling off farmland but risked creating an even more precarious situation for the population.


Investors seeking new areas for cultivation, to produce food, biofuel or for speculation must deal directly with the authorities. Local farmers are dispossessed of their land, expelled and rarely compensated.


This phenomenon increased following soaring food prices in 2008, which raised concerns in several countries about diminishing supplies, notably China, South Korea and the Gulf countries but also in Libya, Egypt and Jordan.


Since then, these countries are acquiring large areas of land, mainly in Africa, Asia and Latin America. In theory, such transactions should be favorable for everyone: contributing to capital, know-how, job creation and modernization in backward, rural areas. The reality however is often shattered by opaque contracts, networks of corruption and the country's elites cashing in without any redistribution.

 

Carole Vann




12-03
18h 30

Le dernier refuge

Guillaume Suon et Anne-Laure Porée • Cambodge • 65´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Land acquisition and forced evictions
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Ghelew Alexandre | Gironde Christophe | Oberhänsli Herbert | Prak Neth | Rabekoto Honoré Augustin | Rapp Jean-Philippe | Wasescha Luzius |

Rwanda-Central African Republic, can mass crimes be prevented ?


Co-presented with the International Organisation of La Francophonie, the International Solidarity Service, Canton of Geneva and the Geneva Academy


There 20 years ago, while a terrible genocide was taking place in Rwanda, both the UN and member states failed miserably in their responsibility to intervene, allowing the massacres of nearly one million victims to take place.



Today, mass murder is happening in the Central African Republic amid similar ethnic and religious tensions. This failed state and blind spot of the Western media, is experiences one of the worst humanitarian crises in its history in general indifference. Nevertheless, some international observers are warning of the risk of genocide.



With resolution 2127 adopted by the Security Council on 5 December, the UN authorized the French forces to intervene  However, no mention was made of the "responsibility to protect" (R2P) mandate which seems to decline with geometrical variation. Except for the 2011 interventions in Libya and the Ivory Coast, the international community has generally ignored R2P.


This important mandate, recognized by the UN since 2005 provides that, on behalf of the UN Security Council, member states may intervene militarily to protect civilians threatened civilians with mass crimes.

 

So how should this duty be applied in Central Africa and many other places?  Can insecurity be invoked to justify international inertia?


Carole Vann




12-03
20h 00

7 jours à Kigali La semaine où le Rwanda a basculé

Mehdi Ba, Jeremy Frey • France • 60´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Rwanda-Central African Republic, can mass crimes be prevented ?
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Braeckman Colette | Brauman Rony | Colin Xavier | Michel Nicolas | Morouba Mathias Barthélémy |

12-03
20h 05

7 jours à Kigali (retransmission en simultanée)

Mehdi Ba, Jeremy Frey • France • 60´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Rwanda-Central African Republic, can mass crimes be prevented ?
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Braeckman Colette | Brauman Rony | Colin Xavier | Michel Nicolas | Morouba Mathias Barthélémy |

12-03
20h 05

7 jours à Kigali La semaine où le Rwanda a basculé

Mehdi Ba, Jeremy Frey • France • 60´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Rwanda-Central African Republic, can mass crimes be prevented ?
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Braeckman Colette | Brauman Rony | Colin Xavier | Michel Nicolas | Morouba Mathias Barthélémy |

Web 2.0: the new breath of revolution.


Co-presented with the Huffington Post France, with the support of Philanthropia Foundation



Thursday, February 20th- the Ukrainian capital Kiev was struck by horror. Victor Yanukovych, backed by Putin, ordered police to use gunfire on protesters. The growing repression has reinforced activists’ determination to mobilize for change. Opponents demand the resignation of the Ukranian tyrant and call for an early election. While condemning Russia, they criticize Europe’s lack of commitment. This period that has gripped the Ukraine has fed the explosion of social networks, powered by the emergence of new technologies.

 

For the past several years, revolts have broken out around the world on an impressive scale. From Iran to Senegal, Brazil, Greece, Turkey, Egypt, thousands of young activists discontent with repression, corruption and archaic political systems, take to the streets demanding democracy, the overthrow of existing governments, all the while questioning society and offering local initiatives and solutions. They are actors in this evolving story.

 

Our world is in a state of transformation, driven by technological change. Social networks and the internet have served as catalysts for ideas, vectors, and mediums for questionning society in depth. In the words of Edgar Morin, will these new technologies contribute to a period of "confusion" or "metamorphosis"?

 

Isabelle Gattiker

 




13-03
20h 30

Sur la ligne de front : une collection de courts-métrage


More Details �

Debates after the film :

Web 2.0: the new breath of revolution.
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Abdulemam Ali | Fix Bernd | Nayyem Mustafa | Temelkuran Ece |

Yes we scan


Co-presented with le Temps 



Article 12 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights guarantees the right to a private life.  However, cyberspace allows the control of  individuals, a violation of protections on private and confidential information.


With today’s hyper-connectivity, countries are now able to watch thousands of people via the Internet and to do so with impunity, according to whistleblower Edward Snowden. His case also raises the question of the right to privacy of information enshrined in Article 19.


The revelations by Wikileaks were applauded by the media until some names were revealed, endangering people involved. Global monitoring by the NSA leads to a denial of privacy by tracing information we communicate and individuals with whom we interact. This obsession to reveal everything, or absolute transparency, could pose a threat to democracy.


Is it the price we must pay to ensure the safety of citizens and nations?


Leo Kaneman




14-03
19h 30

The Snowden Files - Sweden

Joachim Dyfvermark • Suède/Brésil • 49´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Yes we scan
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Assange Julian | Chopin Olivier | Garzón Baltasar | Kurbalija Jovan | Plenel Edwy | Sommaruga Carlo | Werly Richard |

Guantanamo: a legal impasse


Co-presented with OMCT et the UNIGE 



Since its inception, Guantanamo continues to be the emblem of a judicial impasse that plagues the U.S. government to this day as the place where the great Western power established an official policy of torture.


Today, thanks to voices from the media and the courageous hard work of lawyers representing prisoners, the camp no longer holds its dubious track record regarding human rights violations. Nevertheless, some prisoner practices remain contested.


While the most severe types of torture are perpetrated today on other parts of the planet, the eyes of the world continue to be focused on Guantanamo as the symbol of a Western system of human rights violations used in the name of the "war on terrorism”.


Of the 800 prisoners originally incarcerated, less than 1% of them have been convicted. Today, more than 150 remain in detention, most without charge or trial, a clear human rights violation. Moreover, the failure to prosecute those who helped make torture a legitimate tool in the war on terrorism undermines the very foundations of humanitarian law.


President Obama announced the closure of Guantanamo. However, the question that will remain forever attached to the recent history of the United States is how can a nation that prided itself on its human rights record justify this violation of human rights law?

 

Carole Vann




15-03
20h 30

The Guantanamo Trap

• Allemagne/Canada/Suisse/ France • 90´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Guantanamo: a legal impasse
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Bin al Shibh Zaccharia (via Skype) | Corn Geoffrey S. | Docke Bernhard | Sassoli Marco | Staberock Gerald | Trégan François-Xavier |

15-03
20h 35

The Guantanamo Trap

• Allemagne/Canada/Suisse/ France • 90´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Guantanamo: a legal impasse
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Bin al Shibh Zaccharia (via Skype) | Corn Geoffrey S. | Docke Bernhard | Sassoli Marco | Staberock Gerald | Trégan François-Xavier |

Haiti: the impossible reconstruction


Co-presented with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), the Prix Martin Ennals, Arte and the DGVS 



On 12 January 2010, the earthquake that ravaged southern Haiti killed nearly two hundred thousand people. In the following days, the whole world (international organizations in particular) arrived to stand at the bedside of this small country, which was already one of the poorest and the recipient of the most aid.

 

Five billion dollars were raised, eleven promised by governments. The mantra of reconstruction obsessed all those who rushed to this land by nature so chaotic.

 

Four years later while NGOs and partner governments began to tire of what many considered a lost cause, the record remains mixed. The UN mission that unfolded over more than ten years in Haiti is mostly judged through the filter of a cholera epidemic blamed on Nepalese peacekeepers. At the same time, most of the promised funds have not been released while one in two Haitians continues to go hungry.

 


An experiment in universal compassion and development strategy, Haiti has become a symbol of the failure of international aid. Once a pioneer of independence revolutions (1804), this state has been further weakened following the earthquake. Is it not time, when examining the crucial issue of deferred reconstruction, to give voice to the Haitians themselves?

 

Arnaud Robert




16-03
16h 00

Assistance Mortelle

Raoul Peck • France • 100´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Haiti: the impossible reconstruction
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Alexandre Dodly | Biquet Jean-Marc | Khambatta Michael | Robert Arnaud | Seitenfus Ricardo |

16-03
16h 05

Assistance Mortelle

Raoul Peck • France • 100´
More Details �

Debates after the film :

Haiti: the impossible reconstruction
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Alexandre Dodly | Biquet Jean-Marc | Khambatta Michael | Robert Arnaud | Seitenfus Ricardo |

CLOSING CEREMONY


By invitation, Saturday 15th march, 7:00 pm, Auditorium Arditi

 

 

Walesa. Man of Hope

 

By Andrzej Wajda, Polond, 124', 2013, vo polish, st fr
Co-presented with TV5 MONDE


A well-known controversial character, Lech Walesa nevertheless remains a key figure in the Polish uprising of 1970.
Renowned director Andrzej Wajda enthrallingly captures both the public and private life of this former electrician turned political leader and founder of the polish “Solidarity” movement.



In the presence of :

Nicolas Niemtchinow, Ambassador Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations to Geneva
Nicole Wyrsch
, Ambassador, Special Envoy for Human Rights, Federal Department of Foreign Affairs
Gerald Staberock, 
Secretary General of the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT)
Barbara Hendricks
, Opera singer, FIFDH patron
A representative
of the Victor and Hélène Barbour
Foundation Council





15-03
19h 00

Walesa. Man of Hope

Andrzej Wajda • Pologne • 124´
More Details �

CLOSING CEREMONY
More information �

Keynote Speakers :

Hendricks Barbara | Nicole Wyrsch | Niemtchinow Nicolas | Staberock Gerald |